Glow Scotland blog

Glow Scotland

July 2nd, 2008

National Glow Group gets off the ground

Anne Ward
Comments: none 

Many educationalists will already be familiar with ICT Masterclass, an online community of ICT specialists set up to spread the word on how education can harness the benefits of emerging technologies.

Taking advantage of the opportunities for collaboration that Glow presents, the Masterclass has evolved to form an ICT National Glow Group. The Masterclass will still exist as an online community but is now also available through Glow.

‘The real benefit of being part of Glow is the presence of other online communities we can link into and the availability of excellent tools such as Glow Meet,’ said Jennifer McDougall. ‘It provides an opportunity to link together people with a shared interest in ICT and hear diverse views from throughout the country.’

The ICT National Glow Group held its first Glow Chat session on 17 June, where Joe Shaw of Stirling Council took to the hot seat to discuss moving image education. Each session will cover a topical ICT issue or an emerging technology that people would like to discover more about.

In addition to the ICT National Glow Group, there are also National Glow Groups covering the range of curricular areas in Curriculum for Excellence. These are open to all staff using Glow. You can access the National Groups by logging in to Glow.

As well as groups for curricular areas, there is a National staff room which already has sub-groups created for staff. If you would like to request a group at a National level, why not let us know at glowadmin@LTScotland.org.uk.

If you would like to sign up to the ICT National Glow Group, please contact Glow Development Officer Alan Yeoman at A.Yeoman@LTScotland.org.uk.

Categories Stirling

Write a comment

Comment form
 

About This Blog

Glow is transforming the way the curriculum is delivered in Scotland. It breaks down geographical and social barriers and provides the tools to ensure a first-class education for Scotland. The blogs allow practitioners and learners to interact, using familiar social networking tools.